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Europeista d'antan.

Breve storia degli ATM (gli sportelli Bancomat) 30.03.15

The Atlantic racconta la storia degli ATM. Come sono nati, come si sono sviluppati, quanto sono diventati parte integrante del nostro ambiente urbano, in che modo hanno trasformato le abitudini di pagamento e il sistema bancario e quali sono le prospettive per il futuro a partire dai paesi in via di sviluppo.
Lettura interessante anche per chi, 50 anni dopo, ancora confonde le carte di debito con gli sportelli automatici di prelievo, usando lo stesso improprio termine per definire entrambe le cose.

The cash dispenser was born almost 50 years ago, in 1967. For many, this was the first tangible evidence that retail banking was changing; the introduction of the ATM marked the dawn of contemporary digital banking. Several lay claim to the invention of the cashpoint, including John Shepherd-Barron and James Goodfellow in the U.K.; Don Wetzel and Luther Simjian in the U.S.; and even engineering companies like De La Rue, Speytec-Burroughs, Asea-Metior, and Omron Tateisi. But the ATM is a complex technology. There was no single eureka moment that marked its arrival.

The ATM finds its origins in the 1950s and 1960s, when self-service gas stations, supermarkets, automated public-transportation ticketing, and candy dispensers were popularized. The first cash machine seems to have been deployed in Japan in the mid-1960s, according to a Pacific Stars and Stripes account at the time, but little has been published about it since. The most successful early deployments took place in Europe, where bankers responded to increasing unionization and rising labor costs by soliciting engineers to develop a solution for after-hours cash distribution. This resulted in three independent efforts, each of which entered use in 1967: the Bankomat in Sweden, and the Barclaycash and Chubb MD2 in the U.K.