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Il futuro del web passa da HTML5 15.03.10

Mac Slocum: How is HTML5 different than HTML as we currently know it?

Eric Meyer: It's really the HTML we're all used to plus more elements. But that's the 80/20 answer. HTML5 adds new elements for things like sections of a document and articles, and figures and captions for figures. So it covers things that a lot of us do all the time, like create «div class="figure"» and then «p class="caption"» inside of that to go along with an image. Now there's just an element called "figure" and you insert an image and you have an element after that called "caption." There's been an attempt to look at what people are doing. What class names are people using over and over again? What structures are they setting up over and over again? Because HTML doesn't have elements that directly address those. The HTML5 spec also attempts to very precisely and exhaustively describe what browsers should do in pretty much any given circumstance. Older HTML specifications would simply say: "These are the elements. These are the attributes. Here are some basic parsing rules. Here is what you're supposed to do if you encounter an error." HTML5 has these really long algorithms that say: "Do this, then this, then this, then this. And if you hit a problem, here, do this other thing." There's a lot of debate as to whether that's even a good idea. But if the vision that's encoded in those algorithms is brought out -- I'm not saying it will be, but if it is, then browsers will be a lot more interoperable. But that's the base level answer. As you push further into the more obscure corners, then the answer to "how is HTML5 different?" becomes much more complicated.

Via O'Reilly Radar.

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1 commento

torta di mele ha scritto:

vedremo....

postato il 16/03/2010 alle 16:09:05